Legal News


Former FEMA employees indicted for conspiracy to commit bribery, other charges

Two top FEMA officials and a contractor have been charged with using the 2017 hurricane recovery efforts in Puerto Rico to enrich themselves through bribery, gifts and favors by steering work to the contractor on the island.

New online resources available for whistleblowers

The Council of the Inspectors General has announced a new online tool and resource page that aims to help federal employees understand their rights when they report waste, fraud and abuse.

Postal group files lawsuit over pay

The National Association of Postal Supervisors has filed a lawsuit against the U.S. Postal service on the behalf of nearly 50,000 managers, supervisors, postmasters and other professional and administrative employees who the group says are owed back pay.

Court reinstates controversial workforce EOs

A federal court on July 16 reinstated President Donald Trump’s controversial workforce executive orders that aim to make it easier to fire federal workers and restrict their collective bargaining rights.

Study: Political influence is endangering mission at DOJ

Watchdog groups and a member of Congress are raising concerns about too much outside influence on the Justice Department and they have an idea on how to address it.

Paid family leave bill awaits next steps in House

A bill is pending in Congress to provide federal employees with paid family leave for up to 12 weeks.

White House hammers away at federal unions

Actions at EPA and the National Park Service continue the Trump administration's efforts to undermine the power of the federal employee unions.

Higher minimum wage would bring mixed bag

A Congressional Budget Office report says a higher federal minimum wage would help some workers but others may lose their jobs.

Union welcomes supplemental CBP funding

The National Treasury Employees Union is praising Congress for passing the emergency funding for Customs and Border Protection that includes funds for overtime pay.

Feds win standing to sue over OPM breach

The U.S. Court of Appeals has ruled that federal employees can sue the government for compensation for data breaches due to the government's failure to take adequate preventative measures.

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