Trump clasping hands

Executive orders target official time, employee performance

President Trump signed three executive orders aimed at making it easier to fire federal employees and limiting the use of official time, Federal Times reports.

The orders — signed on May 25— will 1) limit the amount of time an employee can be under investigation for misconduct and encourages firings for underperformers, 2) states that employees who conduct union activities while on the job must spend at least 75 percent of their time doing government work and 3) calls for the Office of Personnel Management to renegotiate contracts with unions regarding the reporting of official time instead of working directly with individual agencies.

The American Federation of Government Employees opposed all three of the executive orders, contending that the administration is attempting to replace civil service with political service.

Reader comments

Fri, Jun 22, 2018

Ahman on the lack of integrity. We are seeing what feels like the model on h ok w to destroy a country..and there is no outcry from our so called representives.

Thu, May 31, 2018

There is a problem with the current "process in place" that is not "appropriately utilized" to get rid of the bad performers. Most bad government employees are great at understanding the "process in place" and learn ways to get around it. The "bad managers" now have to spend their time that they are doing their job and the "bad employee's job" to learn how to follow the exact guidelines to get rid of someone.

Wed, May 30, 2018

How is this not a taking? Supreme Court has held government workers have a property right in their jobs. These executive orders diminish the value of the jobs at issue without providing just compensation to employees. Time to file a lawsuit in federal court.

Wed, May 30, 2018 Jade W. Columbus

Haven't a pay raise in 10 years and earn 20% less than I would in the private sector if I were willing to work 100 hours per work and have zero union protection.

Wed, May 30, 2018

As a 16yr fed, I have seen high and low performers and while challenging to rid the lows, it can be done. I'm currently in an office with low morale and poor leadership - this rule makes me worry that after 16 years of maxing my performance ratings, rising to a supv 14 and then to a 15, I or others may fall victim to the inability of our leadership to define/manage the workload beyond their favorites. Anyone with a voice or an idea not part of the favs is ignored, marginalized, detailed, etc. Dysfunctional and unhealthy leadership should not be permitted to affect the careers of dedicated and diligent employees. Caution to any in a similar sitch - document everything.

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