Thinking about calling in sick?

Nobody wants to be a repeat offender for calling in sick, but you also to be safe and consider your job security, so when should you really call in?

Many people show up to work when they really shouldn’t. Gone are the days when people could take guilt- and worry-free sick days when they’re diagnosed with walking pneumonia. Instead, people are clocking in, and walking straight to their desks.

So, in the age of potent and well-advertised over-the-counter remedies and a plethora of “magic pills,” what excuse do you really have for not showing up for work? There are plenty, but we’ll give you 10.

  1. Are you contagious? – From the common cold to a questionable rash on your elbow, if your condition is contagious in any way, please stay home.
  2. Can you focus? – If your ailment is causing you such pain that you are distracted by exhaustion or focused on treating your condition or nursing wounds, then you may not be very productive at work.
  3. Stomach drama – With tummy issues such as cramping, constant trips to the restroom and feelings of nausea, it’s never a good idea to cope with the effects at the office—or anywhere outside of your home, for that matter.
  4. You hurt—If you are in pain that is not quelled with medication, then you may need to stay home.
  5. Are you medically impaired?—When prescription drugs have taken away the pain and are working to make you all better, sometimes side effects can take over, impairing your ability to think, make decisions and exercise good judgment—not a good idea to report to work.
  6. Time is passing with no improvement—If you’ve been dealing with a tolerable issue for a number of days and it’s not passing, it may be time to call in sick so you can get it checked out by your doctor.
  7. Mental health day—Sometimes you just need to take a mental health day to relax and heal.
  8. Caring for others—When you are the caretaker of a sick child or an elderly parent or relative, and you have to tend to their care—a “sick day” is warranted.
  9. Prescribed rest—Oftentimes physicians prescribe nothing but a day of rest. That means no work. It can make a difference in your improvement.

  10. Gross factor—This one speaks for itself—whatever the condition is—be considerate of your co-workers. Nobody wants to see, hear or smell your condition—even if it’s not contagious.

Note: This list  is based on research from a number of sources including WebMD, Salary.com and Psychcentral. No medical professional was consulted. 

Reader comments

Tue, May 15, 2018

You come to work and infect people, this selfish act should be punished as much as possible. Common sense stay home and mend not at the expense of co-workers!

Mon, May 14, 2018

I had an extended period where I was out with serious health issues which precluded me from working for a long period and then, when returning to work, often not be able o work full days. I was lucky as enough peers and co-workers donated leave (I burned through a lot of leave) to keep me from losing to much income. On the downside, being out of site, out of mind, out of the loop and having two senior leadership changes during this period has set me back significantly when it comes to regaining the trust of my peers and superiors in my abilities. That being said, I am slugging away trying to become a valued member of the team.

Mon, May 14, 2018

Excellent discussion of common sense process of understanding why sick leave is there and earned line vacation time. It should be used for situations (short or long term) illinesses, doctors visits etc. It is not to be abused for hangovers or I just do not want to work days. If a person is sick, stay home and please do not bring it to work in which others could get ill or in worse cases die from an infection who are undergoing treatment or have a family of elders or individuals with existing medical conditions. Again management minions are way to lax on enforcing such policies of staying home when sick.

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