AFGE joins call in Congress to reject cuts to fed compensation

The major unions representing federal employees are starting 2018 the way they ended last year—fighting the substantial forces in Congress and elsewhere in government gunning for reducing federal pay and benefits. 

Last month, a group of nearly 100 lawmakers led by fed-friendly House members signed an open letter demanding that their fellows and the White House stop their efforts at making feds sacrifice any more than they already have in recent years. 

The American Federation of Government Employees immediately threw its weight behind the call. 

“Federal employees have had their pay and benefits cut by $182 billion and growing since 2011,” AFGE legislative Director Tom Kahn said in a press release, emphasizing with precision just how much pain a slew of previous freezes and cuts has already imposed. “They are earning 6.5 percent less today than they did at the start of this decade, even as costs for health care, groceries, and other expenses continue to rise. Federal workers can’t afford more cuts to their pay and benefits.” 

Federal employees, and their union leaders, continue to press against reductions in benefits—and frequently note that over the last decade feds suffered a three-year pay freeze at the beginning of the decade and have endured relatively low pay raises ever since. 

 

Reader comments

Thu, Jan 11, 2018

Well the folks governing the decisions for pay raises, COLAS surely are out of touch with reality. Most being multimillionaires have ripped off their employees or other individuals directly or indirectly. Until we clean out the pond scum political minions this will continue into the future years. Too bad the pond scum has very little or no accountability and many government agencies have no independent employee advocates of any time in regards to benefits, pay, promotions and personnel issues. A lot of phony talk how the surveys find more federal employees are satisfied, I guess if they looked at Congress, Snate and management minions who rip off the rank and file employees and get bonuses for such activities would show a favorable employee satisfaction index limited to the few who actually have been responsible for ruining civil service.

Wed, Jan 10, 2018 Paul Letendre Elizabeth City, NC

Perhaps the congress and senate should have their pay slashed. Our federal employee brothers and sisters are far more productive!

Wed, Jan 10, 2018

Federal unions take peoples dues, have large salaries and perks for the union bosses, one thing is for sure they do nothing for the federal employee other than collect dues, award themselves with large bonuses and talk talk talk and do do do nothing in return. Bad investment!

Tue, Jan 9, 2018 jack

There's that 'hope and change' thing again. Didn't seem to work for the feds did it?

Tue, Jan 9, 2018 Millie Caribbean

It's not just about the pay. It's also about fed workers having to serve an entire nation, not just one state or territory. We must take hundreds of trainings, provide the best service, and the information we must know & the protocols we must abide to are of the highest level, as this is all expected of us. It's time that ALL of us unite, state by state -- we must march as ONE, under ONE message. No more! Enough! We must demand respect already. Our benefits have been earned & we must not tolerate politicians to play with them, just for the heck of it. If we we do not unite, we will send the wrong message.

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