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Bill seeks to close retirement loophole for first responders

A bipartisan bill introduced in the House and Senate would change the retirement classification of injured federal first responders who return to work in a different type of federal position.

Photo credit: Jim Lambert/Shutterstock uly 27, 2019. Travelers in long lines at Denver International Airport going thru the Transportation Security Administrations (TSA) security screening areas to get to their flights.

Dems look to expand workplace protections to TSA workers

The bill would move all TSA employees into Title 5 of the U.S. Code, with pay conforming to the general schedule and collective bargaining rights.

U.S. Sen. Gary C. Peters, D-Mich., asks questions during the confirmation hearing of U.S. Secretary of the Army Dr. Mark T. Esper at the Dirksen Senate Office Building, Washington, D.C., July 16, 2019. Esper was nominated for Secretary of Defense by President Donald J. Trump on July 15, 2019. (DoD photo by U.S. Army Sgt. Amber I. Smith)

Sen. Peters takes over committee reviewing workforce priorities

The Senate Homeland Security and Government Affairs Committee will be faced with oversight responsibilities over the SolarWinds hack, the federal government's response to the pandemic and with legislation to implement the Biden administration's priorities for the federal workforce.

Biden fires Trump’s labor appointees

President Joe Biden has asked for the resignation of the entire Federal Service Impasse Panel, a group charged with handling disputes between employee unions and agency negotiators.

Trump clasping hands

Trump revived Andrew Jackson’s spoils system, which would undo America’s 138-year-old professional civil service

The federal government’s core civilian workforce has long been known for its professionalism. About 2.1 million nonpartisan career officials provide essential public services in such diverse areas as agriculture, national parks, defense, homeland security, environmental protection and veterans affairs.

DOD to overhaul transgender service member policies

Over the next two months, the Department of Defense will work with both senior civilian and military leaders to reform policies put in place under the last administration that banned transgender people from serving openly in the U.S. military.

U. S. Navy recruits study using electronic tablets (Navy Live)

Navy examines racism, sexism in the ranks

The Navy's Task Force One Navy report looks to STEM training, recruitment, grooming policies as paths to encourage diversity and inclusion.

USDA: Relocations caused significant workforce damage

A new report tallies up some of the substantial workforce dysfunction—harms broadly predicted by employee unions and personnel experts—that the move inflicted, both in terms of employees who quit or retired early and morale among the remaining workforce.

cloud-enabled telework

Agencies feel IT staff shortages from Trump administration hiring freezes

Trump administration hiring freezes have been causing a strain on federal agencies trying to cope with the demands put on IT staff because of telework.

Fire fighters crossing charred terrain, Los Angeles Padres National Forest, California shutterstock  photo ID: 177444584 By Joseph Sohm

Bill aims to close retirement loophole for federal first responders

Sponsors say the legislation is needed to allow federal first responders to access their retirement benefits if they are injured on the job.

police on capitol steps (Sebastian Portillo/Shutterstock.com)

DHS tells agencies to be on alert, protect employees

In light of the deadly riots at the U.S. Capital last month, the Department of Homeland Security has issued a warning to the heads of federal agencies that government employees and facilities may be a target for a continuance in violence and domestic terrorism.

Report: Military spouses’ job opportunities often hit obstacles

Military spouses—numbering over 605,000 in active duty families alone—could use more help from federal, state and other authorities in finding and keeping good gainful employment in fields in which they possess expertise.

EO: Federal employees gain new $15 minimum wage

Federal employees long have heard that, generally, they are underpaid, according to some reports—that is, when compared with their private-sector counterparts.

Carolyn Maloney chairs a hearing. Photo courtesy house oversight and government reform committee

Paid family and medical leave bill moves to House

House Democrats are looking to extend federal employee benefits with new legislation.

Maxwell AFB; Ala. - Air Force Chief of Staff Gen. Charles Q. Brown; Jr.; speaks with senior leadership and Air University faculty on his vision for AU; Aug. 26; 2020. (US Air Force photograph by Melanie Rodgers Cox/Released)

Air Force chief looks to combat extremism in military

To create a better environment for all service members, Gen. Charles Q. Brown Jr., the Air Force's chief of staff said leadership will have to lay out "what our expectations are for those who are to be a part of our force."

With new administration feds get mask mandate, diversity training reversal

President Joe Biden's Day 1 to-do list includes several federal workforce policies, although it notably does not include the reversal of Trump's controversial Schedule F executive order.

Study: DHS needs to improve employee morale

Some agencies get poor reviews in employee engagement surveys—and the sprawling Department of Homeland Security, sadly, is a perennial member the low morale club.

Plum Book gives look into fed political appointments

The quadrennial book containing lists of jobs filled by appointment in the executive and legislative branches known as the Plum Book came out last week, offering some details, but not a full picture, of senior level positions in the last year of the Trump administration.

Mileage reimbursement rates fall

For the second year in a row, federal employees will get less money for their mileage reimbursements.

2021 Digital Almanac

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