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Thursday Trivia

By FederalDaily Staff

Blog archive

What does the judicial branch do?

A. makes the laws
B. runs the government
C. resolves disputes and disagreements
D. amends the Constitution

 

 

<< scroll down to see the answer >>

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

C. resolves disputes and disagreements

Where the Executive and Legislative branches are elected by the people, members of the Judicial Branch are appointed by the President and confirmed by the Senate.

Article III of the Constitution, which establishes the Judicial Branch, leaves Congress significant discretion to determine the shape and structure of the federal judiciary. Even the number of Supreme Court Justices is left to Congress — at times there have been as few as six, while the current number (nine, with one Chief Justice and eight Associate Justices) has only been in place since 1869. The Constitution also grants Congress the power to establish courts inferior to the Supreme Court, and to that end Congress has established the United States district courts, which try most federal cases, and 13 United States courts of appeals, which review appealed district court cases.

The courts only try actual cases and controversies — a party must show that it has been harmed in order to bring suit in court. This means that the courts do not issue advisory opinions on the constitutionality of laws or the legality of actions if the ruling would have no practical effect. Cases brought before the judiciary typically proceed from district court to appellate court and may even end at the Supreme Court, although the Supreme Court hears comparatively few cases each year.

Federal courts enjoy the sole power to interpret the law, determine the constitutionality of the law, and apply it to individual cases.


More details can be found at www.whitehouse.gov/our-government/judicial-branch

Posted by Jeff Rae on Oct 06, 2011 at 4:02 PM