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Fed diversity: Greater progress in hiring minorities than women

While the federal workforce declined over a one-year period, diversity increased slightly among racial minorities, and the number of women declined, according the second part of an Equal Employment Opportunity Commission report released this week.

While the federal workforce declined over a one-year period, diversity increased slightly among racial minorities, and the number of women declined, according the second part of an Equal Employment Opportunity Commission report released this week.

According to the report – which examined the period of Oct. 1, 2010 through Sept. 30, 2011 – overall diversity improved slightly with feds identifying as Hispanic or Latino increasing from 7.90 percent to 7.95 percent; Asian, from 5.90 percent to 5.95 percent; black or African American from 17.94 percent to 17.97 percent; and Native Hawaiian or other Pacific Islander from 0.36 percent to 0.38 percent.

Regarding gender diversity, the report found that in fiscal year 2011 – of the more than 2.8 million federal employees nationwide – 56.19 percent were men and 43.81 percent  were women, but the overall participation rate for women fell slightly from 43.97 percent the previous fiscal year, after a period of steady gains.

The report also found that the number of feds with severe disabilities – such as deafness, blindness, missing extremities, partial or complete paralysis – increased to 0.90 percent after a consecutive 10-year decline.

Carlton Hadden, director of EEOC's Office of Federal Operations, said in a statement, "While the federal government continues to be a leader in workforce diversity, further progress is needed for it to become a model workplace for all employees.” 

She added, “Agencies should pay particular attention to increasing diversity among the Senior Executive Service and at the highest grade levels, as well as enhancing recruitment and retention of people with targeted disabilities."

Reader comments

Fri, Aug 22, 2014

ANyone wonder if "...paying attention to increasing diversity..." at any level is little more than discrimination given we are talking about gender and ethnicity? What ever happened to hiring the best candidate despite gender or race?

Thu, Aug 21, 2014

At the Food & Drug Administration women are the domominate group amongst leadership, especially at the top. Often they are unqualified.

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